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Programs and Events

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

The Peopling of Ancestral Central America: Molecular Perspectives

Norberto Baldi, Assistant Professor, Biology, University of Costa Rica
12:00pm Friday, April 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, April 6 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group is looking at the robustness of networks. This week's readings will focus on different ways of measuring it, different definitions of it, and its implications for other processes (e.g., evolvability). Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; Dongsheng Zhang, Information and Telecommunication Technology Center; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

STUDENT EVENT

Faculty Coffee Chat: 50 Years of Liberal Arts & Sciences at KU

With Professor James Woelfel, Philosophy and Humanities & Western Civilization
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, April 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Professor Woelfel will discuss "The Idea of A Liberal Education: Continuity and Change," which is a chapter in the forthcoming book "The University of Kansas, 1965-2015." Woelfel defines "liberal education" as "an education that requires of students a wide exposure to human knowledge and culture, typically through 'general education' courses in the liberal arts and sciences." He will discuss the history of general education at KU from 1965 to the present, exploring how KU's curriculum has changed in response to national movements in higher education as well as changes within American society as a whole. A project of the University Honors Program's Co-curricular Student Advisory Board, Faculty Coffee Chats are designed to give students an opportunity to learn from KU's leading faculty in a small, informal setting. This event is open to all members of the KU and Lawrence community. Coffee and snacks will be served.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

PRESENTATION

University Scholarly Achievement Awards

4:30pm Monday, April 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor

The University Scholarly Achievement Awards recognize mid-career scholars who have made significant scholarly or research contributions to their fields. The annual awards are presented in four fields: arts and humanities; clinical science; science, technology and mathematics; and social science and professional programs.

2015 Recipients:
Gregory Cushman, Department of History
Wonpil Im, Molecular Biosciences and Center for Computational Biology
Atanas Stefanov, Mathematics
Andrew Torrance, School of Law

LECTURE/WORKSHOP

Closing the Gap: Salary Negotiation Skills for Women

Facilitated by Keri Westland, State Street Global Human Resources
5:30-7:00pm Wednesday, April 15 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Career Center

Join the University Career Center, The Emily Taylor Center for Gender Equity, and HerCampus to learn about salary equity issues and develop salary negotiation skills.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Movement in Print: Bolivian Migrant Communities and Grassroots Publishing Networks

Magalí Rabasa, Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas
12:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Kij Johnson, English
Daniel Tapia Takaki, Physics & Astronomy
Dawn Fallik, Journalism
John Symons, Philosophy
Stacey Swearingen White, Urban Planning

Event Leader:
Mike Vitevitch, Psychology

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, April 20 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group began after meeting at Red Hot Research in 2011. They have been exploring the computational tools used by James Sterbenz to study the network formed by the national electrical grid to determine whether these tools could be used in other areas and focus on problems in different domains that have a common underlying cause. Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

BOLD ASPIRATIONS LECTURE

Fixing the Past or Inventing the Future?

Yong Zhao, University of Oregon
3:30pm Wednesday, April 22 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Office of the Provost

Education debates have been bewitched by assumptions drawn from the past. These assumptions direct our attention and resources to arguing about immensely important issues from the past that matter little for the future. In this presentation, Yong Zhao argues for the need of shifting the efforts of education reforms from fixing the past obsolete paradigm to inventing a paradigm that helps our children succeed in a world that has been drastically altered by technology and globalization. Dr. Yong Zhao is an internationally known scholar, author, and speaker. His works focus on the implications of globalization and technology on education. He has designed schools that cultivate global competence, developed computer games for language learning, and founded research and development institutions to explore innovative education models. He has published over 100 articles and 20 books, including Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization, World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students, and Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Dragon: Why China has the World’s Best (and Worst) Education System in the World.

INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCE

Interactive Andean Concert: Celebrating Andean Traditions and Earth Day

7:00-8:30pm Wednesday, April 22 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Latin American Graduate Organization

This event features an interactive concert--part lecture, part live performance, with opportunities for audience participation--with native Andean instruments. The performance will feature traditional and modern music as well as a discussion about the region, its cultural and environmental influences, and their relationship to its music.

LUNCHEON

Experiential Learning Luncheon

12:00-2:00pm Friday, April 24 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Experiential Learning Collaborative

Experiential learning encourages students to take an active role in their education by undertaking research, creative projects, service learning, international study, internships, and other activities, in and out of the classroom. Meet new colleagues from different departments and academic units, and receive updates about experiential learning opportunities.

RSVP required by April 17: http://experience.ku.edu/luncheon

SHORT FILMS SCREENING

Kansas Water Short Films Screening & Discussion

4:00-5:30pm Friday, April 24 | The Commons
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation-funded Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmer's Land Use Decisions Project; the Kansas Natural Resource Council, and the Kansas Humanities Council

The Ogallala aquifer, backbone of agriculture in western Kansas, is 30% gone. Nearly all the major perennial streams in the western third of our state are now classified as historic. The state’s reservoirs are silting in and increasingly subject to toxic blue-green algae blooms. The time is ripe for a statewide conversation about our relationship to water – how we’ve used it building and sustaining Kansas, how most of us take it for granted now, and our struggle to account for future generations. The Kansas Natural Resource Council, with help from the Kansas Humanities Council and the National Science Foundation-funded Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers' Land Use Decisions research team, has produced a documentary film series titled "The Waters of Kansas", featuring water resources and people from across Kansas who casually and intimately interact with groundwater or surface water, reservoirs or rivers. Each film touches on the history of developing and using a water source, the current competing interests for water, and how communities are or are not grappling with the future. Two, twenty minute films are featured at this event: "The Waters of Kansas - Cheyenne Bottoms", and "The Waters of Kansas - Farming over the Ogallala".

MEETING

Network Science Reading Group

12:00-1:00pm Monday, May 4 | The Commons

This interdisciplinary reading group began after meeting at Red Hot Research in 2011. They have been exploring the computational tools used by James Sterbenz to study the network formed by the national electrical grid to determine whether these tools could be used in other areas and focus on problems in different domains that have a common underlying cause. Current collaborators: John Symons, Philosophy; James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science; and Michael Vitevitch, Psychology (Contact Michael Vitevitch to join the discussion: mvitevit@ku.edu).

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Human migrations in the Aleutians

Dixie West, Anthropology, Kansas State University
12:00pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

POSTER SESSION

C21 Consortium

3:30-5:30pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

PROGRAM

CLAS Mini College

June 1-4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Mini College is a week-long program developed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It has been providing lifelong learners the opportunity to rediscover the student experience since summer 2009. As the largest academic unit at the University of Kansas, the College is uniquely positioned to offer a broad program that satisfies a wide variety of interests. Courses span the humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, social and behavioral sciences, international and interdisciplinary studies, and the arts. Mini College is open to all adults, not just KU alumni. More information can be found on the Mini-College website: minicollege.ku.edu.