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Programs & Events Programs and Events

INFORMATION SESSION

Interdisciplinary Faculty Starter Grants

11:00am Tuesday, February 9 | The Commons

The Commons Starter Grants support the initial stages of the development of research and creative work that may be overlooked by more conventional disciplinary funding sources, supporting research and creative work that will profoundly integrate multiple disciplines and that will be driven by collaborative work, at its earliest stages. Starter Grants provide intellectual freedom, a space for trying out innovative ideas, and thus, fill a void in standard funding options. Ultimately, this first step is necessary and provides an opportunity for budding research ideas to get their footing and increase the profile of academics at KU and globally. Starter Grants take into consideration projects with potential to develop into proposals for RIC awards. Starter Grants are supported by the KU Office of Research.

UNIVERSITY EVENT

with Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little

3:00pm Tuesday, February 9 | The Commons

Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little will host this event to update the University of Kansas community about KU’s accomplishments and opportunities over the past year and take questions from students, faculty and staff. The event will be open and informal, without podiums, speeches or slides. The Chancellor will provide a brief university update and then open the floor for questions.

HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

The Great Barrier Reef: How Human Stories Matter

Iain McCalman, University of Sydney
7:30pm Wednesday, February 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

The acclaimed historian and explorer will take audiences on a new adventure into the Great Barrier Reef to reveal how our shifting perceptions of the natural world have shaped this extraordinary seascape.

Stretching 1,400 miles along the Australian coast and visible from space, the Great Barrier Reef is home to three thousand individual reefs, more than nine hundred islands, and thousands of marine species, and has alternately been viewed as a deadly maze, an economic bounty, a scientific frontier, and a precarious World Heritage site. Now acclaimed historian, explorer, and University of Sydney Professor of History, Iain McCalman, takes us on a new adventure into the reef to reveal how our shifting perceptions of the natural world have shaped this extraordinary seascape. Showcasing the lives of twenty individuals spanning more than two centuries, “The Great Barrier Reef: How Human Stories Matter” highlights our profound desire to conquer, understand, embrace, and ultimately save the world’s most complex ocean ecosystem.

SEMINAR

What can the Burgess Shale still tell us about early animal evolution?

Jean-Bernard Caron, Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto
3:00pm Thursday, February 11 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum

Dr. Caron’s research focuses on the fossilization and ecology of animals that lived during the Cambrian “explosion” of diversity around 540 to 485 million years ago. He leads regular fieldwork activities during the summers to recover fossils of these animals from the Burgess Shale in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. Dr. Caron has won many awards for his research and outreach activities on the Burgess Shale, including the Pikaia Award for outstanding contributions to Canadian research from the Palaeontology Division of the Geological Association of Canada. Several of his studies, including announcements of the discoveries of new organisms, such as the oldest known fish outside of China, were published in top journals such as Science and Nature. Dr. Caron is dedicated to public outreach as well as to research; he was interviewed by Sir David Attenborough in the Emmy-winning series “First Life,” and also appeared numerous radio interviews and in BBC and Discovery Channel documentaries on Cambrian fossils. Dr. Caron is also overseeing the development of the ROM’s permanent Gallery of the Dawn of Life.

ARTIST TALK

Nacho Rodriguez Bach

6:00pm Wednesday, February 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, and The Commons

Mexican artist Nacho Rodriguez Bach discusses his newly installed interactive project The Path of Thought as a tool for fostering free-thinking and combatting the negativity and violence prevalent in contemporary society. Bach’s multidisciplinary practice merges games, electronic media, and music to produce philosophical propositions and scientific speculations. The Path of Thought will be on view at The Commons and other sites on campus and in the community.

STUDENT EVENT

Career Close Ups: Developing a Career in the Museum World

2:30-4:30pm Thursday, February 18 | The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Natural History Museum, the University Career Center, the Museum Studies Program, the Spencer Museum of Art, and The Commons

Career Close Ups is a program designed to help undergraduate and graduate students explore how any major can lead to a career in a cultural organization. A panel of museum professionals will share their career paths, followed by a networking reception, and behind-the-scenes tours on the inner workings of museums.

Please register for the event here: http://www.spencerart.deptsec.ku.edu/career-close-ups/career-close-ups-registration.php. For more information, contact smadiversity@ku.edu.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH: DIGITAL MEDIA

4:00pm Friday, February 19 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Sara Gregg, History
Jorge Soberón, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology/Biodiversity Institute
Katie Rhine, Anthropology
Andrew Lison, Hall Center for the Humanities
Élika Ortega, Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities

COFFEE @ THE COMMONS

with Photographer Arno Minkkinen

10:00am Friday, February 26 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Design, the Kress Foundation Department of Art History, and The Commons

Arno Rafael Minkkinen is a Finnish American photographer noted for his unmanipulated nude self-portraits in the landscape. Born in Helsinki in 1945, he moved with his family to America in 1951. Raised in Brooklyn, New York, he later attended Wagner College on Staten Island, majoring in English. After five years in the advertising business as a Madison Avenue copywriter, he discovered photography working on the Minolta camera account. “What happens inside your mind can happen inside a camera,” was the turning-point headline he wrote in 1970. A year later, studying with John Benson at the Apeiron Workshops in Millerton, New York, he began his self-portrait work.

Minkkinen has been the subject of many honors and awards including a 2015 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship.

He received his MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design, studying with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. Currently he is Professor of Art at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. He is also docent and visiting professor at the University of Art & Design Helsinki and École d’Art Appliqués in Vevey, Switzerland.

Minkkinen will speak at 6:00pm on Thursday, February 25 in Budig 110 as part of the Hallmark Symposium Lecture Series. More about his work can be found on his website: http://www.arno-rafael-minkkinen.com/

WORKING GROUP

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, February 26 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

Museum Collection Viewing

Spencer Museum of Art Collections Open House

1:00-4:00pm Monday, February 29 | The Commons
Hosted by the Spencer Museum of Art

This monthly event is presented as a part of the Spencer Museum of Art's At Large programming. Visitors will learn about a selection of objects in the Spencer’s Global and Indigenous Collections, featuring a different theme each month. This month, the event will focus on Ceremony & Ritual in African Art.

KENNETH A SPENCER LECTURE

An Evening with Andy Borowitz

Andy Borowitz, in conversation with Steve Kraske
7:00pm Thursday, March 3 | Kansas Union Ballroom

Andy Borowitz has written for The New Yorker since 1998. In 2001, he created the Borowitz Report, a satirical news column, which draws millions of readers, for which he won the first-ever National Press Club award for humor. Borowitz has published two recent best-selling books: “The 50 Funniest American Writers” and “An Unexpected Twist,” a memoir, which Amazon named the Best Kindle Single of 2012. As a comedian, he has performed sold-out shows around the world and has made television and radio appearances, on National Public Radio, VH1, and Comedy Central, among other places.

In addition to his work as host for “Up to Date,” Steve Kraske is a political columnist for The Kansas City Star and a professor of journalism at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Kraske has won numerous awards for his print and broadcast work. The Washington Post has called him one of the top state political reporters in the nation. He has appeared on National Public Radio and CNN’s Capital Gang and Inside Politics as well as on Kansas City Week in Review on KCPT.

The annual Kenneth A. Spencer Memorial Lecture is presented by The Commons and features a “central and significant figure in his or her chosen field.” The 2015 Kenneth A. Spencer Memorial Lecture was delivered by Margaret Atwood.

This event is free and open to the public, but tickets will be required. Tickets for the ballroom have sold out. Only overflow seating remains.

RESERVE YOUR TICKET FOR OVERFLOW SEATING IN WOODRUFF AUDITORIUM, HERE: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-evening-with-andy-borowitz-in-conversation-with-steve-kraske-tickets-21368042390

CONFERENCE

See/Saw Festival Research Conference

1:00-6:00pm Friday, March 4 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Kansas Humanities Council, the KU School of Education, Department of Special Education, Center for Global and International Studies, Office of Diversity and Equity, Department of African and African American Studies, Department of American Studies, the Center for East Asian Studies, and The Commons

The See/Saw Festival is a combined film festival and graduate student research conference featuring research and film to explore complex social issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. The 2016 theme for the See/Saw Festival is titled “On the Brink: Borders, Boundaries, and Becoming.” The theme focuses on the concept of navigating and pushing ‘borders’ that operate across multiple domains, from physical or geographical boundaries to identity (e.g. race/ethnicity, (dis)ability, gender, class). This weekend of interdisciplinary events will engage the university and Lawrence community in dialogue around issues of social justice. The Festival is free and open to the public.

Events at the KU Commons will include graduate student poster presentations from 1-2 pm and a keynote address by Dr. Valerie Kinloch at 6 pm. Dr. Kinloch is a Professor of Literacy Studies and Director of the EHE Office of Diversity and Inclusion at The Ohio State University

More information can be found at seesawfest.com. You can also contact seesawfest@gmail.com.

ARTIST TALK

Diego Romero: Contemporary Pueblo Potter

6:30pm Thursday, March 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, and The Commons

Santa Fe-based artist Diego Romero merges autobiography with contemporary narratives and stories of colonial violence to investigate cross-sections between Indian life and the absurdity of all humans. Organized in conjunction with the 50th anniversary conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts, Romero’s talk traces the arc of his practice over the past 20 years. During the talk, enjoy works from the Museum’s collection including two pieces by Romero and a range of Pueblo pottery selected for display. Romero’s visit is possible through the Judith M. Cooke Native American Art Fund and gifts made in memory of Joni Lisa Thompson.

HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

Human Trafficking in the Heartland

Hannah Britton, Associate Professor of Political Science and Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies, University of Kansas
7:30pm Tuesday, March 22 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

Hannah Britton is KU associate professor of political science and women, gender & sexuality studies as well as director of the Center for the Study of Injustice. In this role, she coordinates KU's Anti-Slavery and Human Trafficking Initiative, which is a working group of faculty and students engaged in teaching and research about slavery and trafficking. Her talk will focus on human trafficking in the heartland.

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH: CLIMATE

4:00pm Friday, March 25 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Museum Collection Viewing

Spencer Museum of Art Collections Open House

1:00-4:00pm Monday, March 28 | The Commons
Hosted by the Spencer Museum of Art

This monthly event is presented as a part of the Spencer Museum of Art's At Large programming. Visitors will learn about a selection of objects in the Spencer’s Global and Indigenous Collections, featuring a different theme each month. This month, the event will focus on Native American Ceramics of the Southwest.

LECTURE

At Large Lecture Series: Land(un)locked

6:00pm Thursday, March 31 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art and The Commons

Artist, curator, and researcher Steve Rowell explores the intersection of technology and culture, and society’s interventions on, beneath, and above the landscape. Join him for a discussion of current and recent sites under investigation—from the Svalbard Global Seed Vault to remote sensing labs, to sites of water extraction in California—and the ways that artistic research can reveal their stories. Taking the long view, Rowell offers a meditation on the tangled relationship between advancement of society and environmental sustainability.

SYMPOSIUM

NetSci-LASH (Network Science in Languages, Arts, Sciences & Humanities)

April 1-2 | The Commons

Funded by a Starter Grant and organized by Michael Vitevitch (Psychology) and Arienne Dwyer (Anthropology, Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities) this workshop will convene leading researchers to demonstrate how network science has been applied to examine language, the arts, the humanities and the sciences. Participants can also learn how to apply these analysis techniques in their own work. Using the principles of Network Science, researchers examine complex systems and the relationships that exist between individuals in that system (e.g., people in a social group, animals in an ecosystem).

The morning of each day will feature talks by leading researchers who have employed network analysis in their discipline. The afternoons will feature tutorials to introduce scholars and researcher to the basic terminology of network analysis, and to user-friendly software packages that will enable you to do your own analyses. These tutorials are intended for faculty, students, post-doctoral fellows, staff and others who would like to gain an understanding of the fundamentals of network science for application to research in their respective fields, or as a basis for pursuing network science research. Attendance (to some or all of the events) is free, but to help us prepare adequate staff and seating please register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/netsci-lash-network-science-in-languages-arts-sciences-humanities-tickets-20584047440

Ada Limón is the author of three books of poetry, Lucky Wreck, This Big Fake World, and Sharks in the Rivers. She received her Master of Fine Arts in Poetry from New York University where she studied with Philip Levine, Sharon Olds, Mark Doty, and Marie Howe among others. Limón has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and was one of the judges for the 2013 National Book Award in Poetry. She is currently working on a book of essays, a novel, and her new collection of poems, Bright Dead Things is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. She works as a freelance writer and creative writing instructor while splitting her time between Lexington, Kentucky and Sonoma, California (with a great deal of New York in between).

Adam Clay is the author of A Hotel Lobby at the Edge of the World (Milkweed Editions, 2012) and The Wash (Parlor Press, 2006). A third book of poems is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Ploughshares, Poetry Daily, Crab Orchard Review, Boston Review, Denver Quarterly, The Kenyon Review Online, Black Warrior Review, Iowa Review, The Pinch, and elsewhere. He co-edits TYPO Magazine and teaches at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Michael Robins is the author of In Memory of Brilliance & Value (Saturnalia Books, 2015), Ladies & Gentlemen (Saturnalia, 2011), The Next Settlement, which received the Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry (UNT Press, 2007), and the chapbooks Little Felons (Strange Machine Books, 2013) and Circus (Flying Guillotine Press, 2009). His recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in Forklift, Ohio, H_NGM_N, The Iowa Review, The Laurel Review, Manor House Quarterly, Mantis, Mid-American Review, Newfound, Pinwheel, RHINO, Sakura Review, Similar:Peaks::, So and So Magazine, Timber, and elsewhere. His essays and book reviews have appeared in journals such as MAKE, Pilot Light, Poets for Living Waters, Redactions, and in the anthology The Field Guide to Prose Poetry (Rose Metal Press, 2010).

LECTURE

At Large Lecture Series: The Challenge of Building a National Museum

6:00pm Wednesday, April 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Museum Studies Program, and The Commons

Lonnie G. Bunch, III discusses the history and struggle of creating the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), where he is founding director. The NMAAHC opens on the National Mall in fall 2016 as the 19th museum of the Smithsonian Institution. Bunch outlines a vision for how the Museum will help the Smithsonian transition from a 19th-century institution to a 21st-century enterprise.

WORKING GROUP

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, April 15 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

Museum Collection Viewing

Spencer Museum of Art Collections Open House

1:00-4:00pm Monday, April 18 | The Commons
Hosted by the Spencer Museum of Art

This monthly event is presented as a part of the Spencer Museum of Art's At Large programming. Visitors will learn about a selection of objects in the Spencer’s Global and Indigenous Collections, featuring a different theme each month. This month, the event will focus on Flutes of the World.

LECTURE

Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam

Fredrik Logevall
7:30-9:30pm Thursday, April 21 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

In May, President Obama declared 2012 the 50th anniversary of the start of Vietnam War yet the first American names etched onto the Vietnam Memorial died in 1959. Why the discrepancy? There’s no way to answer that question without answering the larger question of how America ended up at war in Vietnam. In his groundbreaking new book Embers of War, Harvard historian Fredrik Logevall traces the origins back further than most Americans realize. In doing so he not only demonstrates how at least six presidents made strategic foreign policy errors that would ultimately lead to the deaths of some 58,000 Americans, he also illuminates the disturbing parallels with our current experience in Afghanistan and the Middle East. Fredrik Logevall is an award-winning historian, accomplished educator, and prolific writer on the Vietnam War and its legacy. Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam won both the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in History and the prestigious Parkman Prize, which deemed it an “extraordinary work of modern history.” The book draws on more than a decade of research, accessing sources and archives on three continents never before tapped.

SYMPOSIUM

Justice in the low-carbon shift

April 28 | The Commons

Funded by a Starter Grant and organized by Uma Outka (School of Law), Rachel Krause (School of Public Affairs and Administration), and Ward Lyles, (School of Architecture, Design, and Planning), this symposium will look at how local energy transitions can be leveraged to advance community social justice objectives. The symposium is part of a larger research project entitled “Localized Energy and Climate Adaptation: Advancing Community-Scale Social Justice Goals”, and is situated at the nexus of two approaches to climate change research - mitigation and adaptation - and explores their intersection through a social equity lens. More information about the symposium is available at the following link: https://www.conferize.com/conferences/localized-energy-and-climate-adaptation-advancing-social-justice-in-the-low-carbon-transition

FACULTY EVENT

RED HOT RESEARCH: POLITICAL ENGAGEMENT

4:00pm Friday, April 29 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Museum Collection Viewing

Spencer Museum of Art Collections Open House

1:00-4:00pm Monday, May 2 | The Commons
Hosted by the Spencer Museum of Art

This monthly event is presented as a part of the Spencer Museum of Art's At Large programming. Visitors will learn about a selection of objects in the Spencer’s Global and Indigenous Collections, featuring a different theme each month. This month, the event will focus on Animals and Art.

WORKING GROUP

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, May 6 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.