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Programs & Events Programs and Events

Research Sharing

SHOW: Your Research SHaring through Outreach Workshop

1:00-5:00pm Friday, September 30 | The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Chapter of Sigma Xi, an interdisciplinary research society

This event is intended to bring together researchers from across campus and will focus on the importance of communicating scholarly activity to the public. The first 30 minutes will feature a plenary, including basic tips/ideas about how to do share your work with broader audiences. Brendan Lynch, public affairs officer with KU News, will present this introduction.

The event will continue with a 60-minute panel of experts. Each panelist will have about 10-minutes to share examples from his/her experience and then we will have time for questions. The panel will include:

  • Steven B. Case, Director Center for STEM Learning, Co-Director UKan Teach Program
  • Ben Smith, Director of Social and Emerging Media at Callahan Creek, Founder & Host of ConfabuLarryum
  • Celka Straughn, Andrew W. Mellon Director of Academic Programs, Spencer Museum of Art
  • Lorin P. Maletsky, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, School of Engineering

    Additional events will follow from 2:30-5:00, beginning with an exhibition period during which others who are engaged in outreach activities will be able to share their work. Following that, there will be discussion tables where attendees can meet with exhibitors/experts to discuss the attendee’s emerging ideas for outreach activities.

  • FORUM

    Places, Spaces, Sites: Mapping Critical Intersections in Digital Humanities

    Digital Humanities Forum 2016
    8:00am Saturday, October 1 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the KU Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities

    The Institute for Digital Research in the Humanities will host its sixth annual Digital Humanities Forum, September 29 through October 1. This year’s theme, “Places, Spaces, Sites: Mapping Critical Intersections in Digital Humanities,” seeks to interrogate and critique how the proliferation of digital technologies intersects and collides with notions of place and space across the humanities. The Forum will feature a range of hands-on workshops on Thursday, September 29 and Friday, September 30. The conference will begin with a reception Friday evening, featuring a keynote address and poster session. Saturday, October 1 will include two more keynote addresses, as well as paper presentations, panel discussions, and a poster session. The entire event is free and open to the public. To register and learn more, visit https://idrh.ku.edu/dhforum2016.
    For a schedule, visit the website: https://idrh.ku.edu/schedule

    PERFORMANCE

    Sarod, Tabla and Violin: A Musical Conversation Among Maestros

    Purnaprajna Bangere, violin
    Supreet Deshpande, tabla
    Anirban DasGupta, sarod
    7:00pm Monday, October 3 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities and The Commons

    Purnaprajna Bangere studied under the well known south Indian violinist HKN Murthy, who is the student of the legendary Indian musicians Parur Sundaram Iyer, M. S. Anantharaman, and M. S. Gopalakrishnan. Purna's playing has been hailed for its high technical virtuosity and musicianship. In recent years, he has been invited to perform in many major music festivals in North America.






    Supreet Deshpande is one of the leading tabla virtuousos of Indian classical music. He was trained by his illustrious father, tabla virtuoso Pt. Kiran Deshpande, and by the great tabla maestro Pt. Suresh Talwalkar. His style features a clarity of ‘bols’ (syllables) paired with a soothing balance of ‘naad’ (sound), technique, and crisp rendering of complex rhythms.






    Anirban DasGupta is the son of the renowned sarod maestro Padmabhushan Pdt. Buddhadev Dasgupta, with whom he studied. He grew up with great exposure to Hindusthani Classical Instrumental Music. He won an All India radio competition in 1987 and has performed around the world.







    A light reception will follow the performance.

    LECTURE & DISCUSSION

    Opening Up the Margins

    April Hathcock, Scholarly Communications Librarian, NYU
    10:00-11:30am Thursday, October 6 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the Shulenburger Office of Scholarly Communication & Copyright at the KU Libraries

    The Open Access movement has helped to make scholarly materials more widely available to researchers across the globe. It has also helped to open the doors for scholars who are often excluded from scholarly discourse to participate in forming the scholarly record. This keynote will explore ways to bring in voices from the margins and efforts we can make to ensure that commonly marginalized voices are welcomed into the mainstream of scholarly discourse.

    April Hathcock is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at NYU where she educates the campus community on issues of ownership, access, and rights in the research lifecycle. Before entering librarianship, she practiced intellectual property and antitrust law for a global private firm. Her research interests include diversity and inclusion in librarianship, cultural creation and exchange, and the ways in which social and legal infrastructures benefit the works of certain groups over others.

    COFFEE @ THE COMMONS

    Art in the Time of Surveillance
    with Photographer Tomas Van Houtryve

    10:00am Friday, October 7 | The Commons
    The Hallmark Corporate Foundation, the Department of Design, The Photography Society at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and The Commons

    Tomas Van Houtryve is an artist, photographer and author who engages critical contemporary issues around the world. Initially a student in philosophy, Tomas developed a passion for photography while enrolled in an overseas university program in Nepal. Immediately after graduation in 1999, he moved to Latin America. In 2002, he was the principal photographer of the military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

    In 2013 Tomas began working on Blue Sky Days, a drone’s-eye view of America. Images from the project were first published in Harper’s as the largest photo portfolio in the magazine’s 164-year history. The series was awarded the 2015 ICP Infinity Award and honors from POY, World Press Photo, the Photographic Museum of Humanity, and the White House News Photographer’s Association. More recently, he completed Packing Heat, a photographic exploration of the New York City Police Department’s Domain Awareness System.

    He is a member of VII Photo.

    He explains that “Underpinning my work is a belief that human activity becomes increasingly absurd and dangerous when it loses empathy. I agree with Albert Camus when he said, ‘By definition, a government has no conscience. Sometimes it has a policy, but nothing more.’”

    WORKING GROUP

    C21 Consortium

    2:00-3:30pm Friday, October 7 | The Commons
    Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

    KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

    MIGRATION LECTURE SERIES

    Legality and Precarity Among Middle-Class Venezuelan Migrants

    Lourdes Gouveia, Emerita, University of Nebraska, Omaha
    12:00pm Wednesday, October 12 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the Center for Migration Research and the Institute for Policy & Social Research

    Dr. Lourdes Gouveia is the founding director emerita of OLLAS and professor emerita of Sociology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her teaching and research focuses on Latin American migration, US Latino population, Latin American societies in the globalization era, global development and food and agriculture. Her most recent publications include: Patterns of Migration: Latin America and the United States (Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration. London: Wiley-Blackwell. Forthcoming); Latino Voting Eligibility in Nebraska (OLLAS Data Brief. March 2011); The Omaha Site: Migrant Civil Society Under Construction (Woodrow Wilson Institute. 2010) and The Research-Policy Gap on Latino/Latino Immigrant Issues: Impacts and New Directions on Social Policy (Journal of Social Issues. 2010). As a researcher and Director of OLLAS, Dr. Gouveia has secured more than $1.5 million in funding. She sits on the boards of the International Network on Migration and Development, Partnership For Our Kids and the Heartland Workers Center. She has won numerous community and University Awards.

    RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY DISCUSSION

    Smart Cities Grant Opportunities

    3:00-4:00pm Wednesday, October 12 | The Commons
    Hosted by the Office of Research Development

    This event will focus on current NSF funding opportunities in Smart and Connected Communities--specifically, solicitations NSF 16-610 and DCL 16-140. The meeting will also be an opportunity to update the attendees on current activity in the MetroLab collaboration, the developing Advanced Wireless efforts, KC initiatives, etc.

    For more information on this event, contact Doug Bornemann: dbornemann@ku.edu

    FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION

    3 1/2 Minutes, 10 Bullets

    7:00pm Wednesday, October 12 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the KU Honors Program, the Office of First-Year Experience, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

    In 3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets, two lives intersected and were forever altered. On Black Friday 2012, two cars parked next to each other at a Florida gas station. A white middle-aged male and a black teenager exchanged angry words over the volume of the music in the boy’s car. A gun entered the exchange, and one of them was left dead. Michael Dunn fired 10 bullets at a car full of unarmed teenagers and then fled. Three of those bullets hit 17-year-old Jordan Davis, who died at the scene. Arrested the next day, Dunn claimed he shot in self-defense. Thus began the long journey of unraveling the truth. 3 ½ Minutes, Ten Bullets follows that journey, reconstructing the night of the murder and revealing how hidden racial prejudice can result in tragedy. View the trailer here.

    Join us for a screening of this 2015 documentary.

    WORKSHOP

    Campus to Community Workshop

    8:00am - 12:00pm Friday, October 14 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the KU Innovation and Collaboration

    KU Innovation and Collaboration will host this workshop to expand engagement efforts with the public, community organizations, business and industry, state and local government, and others. KU Faculty members are invited to join their KU colleagues to better understand the full engagement spectrum, to learn about innovative engagement efforts, and to help shape the future state of engagement at KU.

    The event will feature introductory remarks by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little; a keynote presentation by Jim K. Woodell, Vice President, Economic Development & Community Engagement at the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities; and Engagement Spotlights in the form of two-minute presentations from colleagues that highlight specific innovative engagement people, strategies, approaches, or initiatives.

    This event requires pre-registration, here. Registration will be open through October 14.

    GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

    Red Hot Graduate Research

    4:00pm Friday, October 14 | The Commons

    Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each.

    Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

    SYMPOSIUM

    The Scholarship of Social Engagement Symposium

    October 20-21, 2016 | The Commons
    Supported by an Interdisciplinary Starter Grant

    The University of Kansas is convening a symposium that assembles internationally recognized thought leaders on the subject of critical engagement. These practitioners and their work are presented at conferences, through exhibits, and in literature.

    Our symposium seeks to investigate the theoretical underpinnings of such work and translate these action-based community engagement efforts into interdisciplinary and theoretically-based scholarship. We will convene this group of scholars in order to establish a framework for the critical inquiry and review of the public impact of socially engaged discourse and design. The symposium will gather a group of scholars, practitioners, critics, and historians to discuss different aspects, forms, and features of social engagement that have developed across time and regions.

    Additional information on the symposium, submission, calendar of events, registration, and organizers can be found at: http://sse2016.wix.com/socialengagementku

    This symposium and the research it supports are led by Joe Colistra, Architecture; Martha Rabanni, Peace & Conflict Studies; Jeremy Shellhorn, Design; Amanda Schwegler, Center for Civic & Social Responsibility; and Andi Witczak, Service Learning at K-State Olathe.

    CONFERENCE

    Trans/forming Activist Media in the Americas

    October 28-29 | The Commons
    Supported by an Interdisciplinary Starter Grant

    Trans/forming Activist Media in the Americas brings together an interdisciplinary group of activist media producers and scholars from across North America to explore this research question: How are current activist movements in the Americas transformed by migrations, of people and ideas, across new media forms and modalities?

    The events will include screenings of activist documentaries; a discussion and performance by Bocafloja; an exhibit and workshops on the production and meaning of public art, led by Gregg Deal and Kai Barrow; two roundtable dialogues among activists and artists on media and migration in their work, including KU faculty (Elizabeth Esch, David Roediger, and Robert Warrior); and a closing keynote by Maurice Rafael Magaña (University of Arizona).​

    Trans/forming Activist Media in the Americas, convened by Joo Ok Kim (American Studies), Joshua Miner (Film & Media Studies), Christopher Perreira (American Studies), and Magalí Rabasa (Lewis & Clark College), is a Commons Starter Grant Project, co-sponsored by the Center for Migration Research.

    LECTURE & DISCUSSION

    The Journey Out of the Racial Divide: Reflections on the Reclamation of the Human Spirit
    Michael Penn, Department Chair & Professor of Psychology at Franklin & Marshall College

    3:00pm October 31 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the KU Libraries, KU Law School, and Peace & Conflict Studies

    If they are to be effective, modern movements designed to overcome the five hundred year legacy of racism must better understand, embody, and exploit a more universal notion of what it means to be human. If we are to win the hearts of the masses of humanity in the effort to overcome racism, xenophobia, and a variety of other identity based conflicts, social movements must be grounded in the recognition that the long term protection of humanity requires respect for and cultivation of those universal moral, intellectual, and spiritual capacities that are embodied in the notion of the human spirit. I seek, therefore, to provide a rational account of the nature and needs of the human spirit and endeavor to relate the capacities of the human spirit to the work that must be carried forward during this unique and tumultuous period in the life of humanity.

    Dr. Michael Penn is Department Chair and Professor of Psychology at Franklin & Marshall College. Professor Penn has lectured widely around the world and has been invited to serve as a consultant and speaker at United Nations-related conferences in several countries. He serves as faculty for the United Nations Staff College in Turin, Italy, and as a trainer for the UN Leader’s Programme, which trains Director-level United Nations officers. For the past 25 years Professor Penn has focused his research and teaching on the world’s most challenging problems. These problems include the problem of violence against women and girls, racism and intergroup conflict, hopelessness, and the challenge of relational authenticity.

    POETRY READING

    Melissa Buzzeo

    7:00pm Wednesday, November 2 | The Commons
    Sponsored by the Department of English

    Melissa Buzzeo's recent book The Devastation (Nightboat 2015) was a Lambda Literary Award finalist in Poetry. She is also the author of For Want and Sound (Les figues 2013), Face (Bookthug 2009) and What Began Us (Leon Works 2007). She is working on a new book--a simple kind of memoir, a history of sexuality and something else opening or shutting it. It is called Writing.

    She lives in Brooklyn and teaches creative writing, feminism and poetics of healing at Pratt Institute.

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 35: New Applications of Network Science

    4:00pm Friday, November 4 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 36: Improvisation

    4:00pm Friday, December 2 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    KENNETH A. SPENCER LECTURE

    Jessica Green

    7:00pm Wednesday, February 8 | Location TBD

    Green is a world renowned scientist inspiring people to think about bacteria in entirely new ways. An Alec and Kay Keith Professor of Biology at the University of Oregon and professor at the Santa Fe Institute, Green is helping us see how the microbial blueprint of our bodies, homes, cities, and forests impacts our world, and our future. As co-founder and CTO of Phylagen, a DNA data harvesting and analytics company, Green envisions a future for urban design that promotes sustainability, human health, and well-being.

    Green is currently spearheading efforts to model urban spaces as complex ecosystems that house trillions of diverse microorganisms interacting with each other, with humans, and with their environment. She calls it the “built environment microbiome.” As founding director of the Biology and the Built Environment (BioBE) Center, she is working with architects and engineers to advance our understanding of how microbial communities assemble, interact, evolve, and influence public health. In addition, she is co-creating a graphic novel about the urban microbiome with graphic designer Steve Green and writer and TED Fellow Anita Doron.

    Green is internationally recognized for highly cited publications in Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her work has been featured in TIME, ABC, NBC, NPR, Forbes, Discover, Scientific American, and The Economist. She is the recipient of the Blaise Pascal International Research Chair, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, and a TED Senior Fellowship. She earned an M.S. in Civil/Environmental Engineering and Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering, both at the University of California, Berkeley.

    HUMANITIES LECTURE SERIES

    Pursuing Elusive Equity in Higher Education

    Jennifer Hamer, Professor of American Studies
    7:30pm Tuesday, March 28 | The Commons
    Supported by the Hall Center for the Humanities

    Jennifer Hamer is KU Professor of American Studies/African & African American Studies and Chair of the American Studies department. Her general area of study is the family, and within this broad field, her primary research interests are African American fathers, mothers, and families, especially those that are working class. Lately, she has turned her attention to diversity and equity in higher education. Her lecture will explore “Pursuing Elusive Equity in Higher Education.”

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 37

    4:00pm Friday, February 3 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 38

    4:00pm Friday, February 24 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

    Red Hot Graduate Research

    4:00pm Friday, March 3 | The Commons

    Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each.

    Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 39

    4:00pm Friday, March 31 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

    FACULTY EVENT

    Red Hot Research No. 40

    4:00pm Friday, April 21 | The Commons

    Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.