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Programs and Events

KENNETH A. SPENCER LECTURE:
An Evening with Margaret Atwood

Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?: The Arts, The Sciences, The Humanities, the Inhumanities, and the Non-Humanities. Zombies Thrown In Extra.

7:00pm Monday, February 2 | Kansas Union, Ballroom

The Commons is pleased to present Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?: The Arts, The Sciences, The Humanities, the Inhumanities, and the Non-Humanities. Zombies Thrown In Extra, through the support of the Kenneth A. Spencer Lecture Fund.

Literary icon Margaret Atwood, celebrated for her prescient vision and poetic voice, discusses the real-world origins of her speculative fiction and the roles of art, science and imagination in her creative process. A winner of many international literary awards, including the prestigious Booker Prize, Atwood is the bestselling author of more than thirty volumes of poetry, children's literature, fiction, and non-fiction. She is best known for her novels, which include The Edible Woman, The Handmaid's Tale, The Robber Bride, Alias Grace, The Blind Assassin, Oryx and Crake, and The Year of the Flood. Her non-fiction book Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth, was recently made into a documentary. Atwood's work has been published in more than forty languages. In 2004, she co-invented the LongPen, a remote signing device that allows someone to write in ink anywhere in the world via tablet PC and the internet. Born in 1939 in Ottawa, Atwood grew up in northern Ontario, Quebec, and Toronto. She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe College.

A reception and book-signing will follow the talk.

photo credit: Jean Malek

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The Lawrence Public Library and KU Libraries have selected Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale as the Read Across Lawrence book for 2015. Find out more about programs, activities, and opportunities to get involved in the conversation here: http://www.lawrence.lib.ks.us/news-events/ral2015/ral2015/.

STUDENT EVENT

Coffee Chat

with Jennifer Hamer, Professor of American Studies and African & African-American Studies
2:00pm Tuesday, February 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Hosted by the students of the University Honors Program, Coffee Chats provide a venue for informal conversations between students and KU faculty. The organizing students have selected a theme each month to discuss with the faculty member. February's discussion topic is: Black History Month.

FILM SCREENING

The Man Who Saved the World

7:00pm, Tuesday, February 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Physics & Astronomy

This screening will spark a discussion about the intersection of technology, weapons, and the human conscience. In 1983, a new Russian satellite erroneously indicated that the United States had launched a missile strike against the Soviet Union. A counter-strike was ordered, but Colonel Stanislav Petrov refused to carry it out. Though his action was very much against the military culture in which Colonel Petrov was immersed, it provided crucial time for the satellite information to be checked. Discussion following the screening will seek to investigate similar situation in our current time.

View the promotional poster here: The Man Who Saved the World

PANEL

Feminism through the Decades

7:00pm Thursday, February 5 | The Commons
Offered as part of Read Across Lawrence programming for 2015. Sponsored by the Lawrence Public Library, KU Libraries, and The Commons

Inspired by Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Read Across Lawrence book of 2015, this panel discussion will focus on the challenges women from different generations have faced. Panelists include: CJ Brune, An Original Member of the February Sisters; Carla Rivas, Student Activist; Alice Lieberman, Professor of Social Welfare, University of Kansas; and Katie Batza, Assistant Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies, University of Kansas. The panel will be moderated by Elise Higgins, Kansas Manager of Government Affairs, Planned Parenthood.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, February 6 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

RED HOT RESEARCH

with the Spencer Museum of Art

4:00pm Friday, February 6 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
May Tveit, Design
Val Stella, Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Mike Kautsch, Law
Molly Zahn, Religious Studies
Perry Alexander, Electrical Engineering Computer Science
Emcee: James Sterbenz, Electrical Engineering Computer Science

POETRY READING

Carmen Giménez Smith

7:00pm Monday, February 9 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of English; the Office of Multicultural Affairs; the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and The Commons

Carmen Giménez Smith is the author of a memoir, Bring Down the Little Birds, four poetry collections— Milk and Filth, Goodbye, Flicker, The City She Was, and Odalisque in Pieces. Milk and Filth was a finalist for the NBCC Award in Poetry. She is the recipient of a 2011 American Book Award, the 2011 Juniper Prize for Poetry, and a 2011-2012 fellowship in creative nonfiction from the Howard Foundation. A CantoMundo Fellow and formerly a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she is the editor-in-chief of the literary journal Puerto del Sol and the publisher of Noemi Press.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

What Labor Migrant Knowledge Reveals about the Political Economy: Haitians in the Dominican Republic

Kiran Jayaram, Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculté d'Ethnologie, Université d'Etat d'Haïti; Lecturer, Haitian Studies, University of Kansas
12:00pm Friday, February 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, February 13 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Daniel Coburn, Design
Magalí Rabasa, Spanish & Portuguese
Erik Perrins, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
John Kelly, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Jane Barnette, Theatre
Emcee: Jon Lamb, English

LECTURE

The New Communication Climate

Andrew Revkin, Science and Environmental Writer
7:00pm Thursday, February 19 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Sustainability, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and The Commons

Prize-winning journalist, online communicator, and author, Andrew Revkin explores issues and opportunities arising as both the environment and the media experience an era of unprecedented and unpredictable change. He is the senior fellow for environmental understanding at Pace University's Academy for Applied Environmental Studies where he teaches courses on blogging, environmental-science communication, and documentary video with a focus on sustainable development. He writes the award-winning Dot Earth blog in the Op-Ed section of The New York Times. He is the author of several books on climate change, including Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast, which accompanied the first museum exhibition on climate change, at the American Museum of Natural History in 1992.

IDEA CAFÉ

Why we should be optimistic about the Anthropocene

Andrew Revkin, Science and Environmental Writer
12:00pm Friday, February 20 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Sustainability, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and The Commons

The Idea Café is intended to elicit energetic exchanges between attendees in response to the speaker's introduction.

RSVP by February 12 to thecommons@ku.edu. Limit 40 guests.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, February 20 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

WORKSHOP

A Transdisciplinary Exploration of Human Systems

4:00-8:00pm Friday, February 20 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art and The Commons

Researchers and practitioners from all disciplines are invited to work with Portuguese choreographer João Fiadeiro to explore the intersections between art and science in a focused two-day workshop. Fiadeiro is in residence at KU from February 15–28 as the first creative specialist hosted by the Spencer Museum's Arts Research Collaboration initiative (ARC). His method of “real-time composition” focuses on process rather than product, transforming movement into a theoretical-practical tool and platform to understand and rethink decision, representation, and cooperation, both in art and in life. Open to all faculty, staff, and students, this workshop will be of special interest to those in the fields of dance and theater, as well as complex systems sciences, cognitive science and linguistics, clinical psychology, anthropology, philosophy, neuroscience, and management. The workshop takes place from 4–8 PM on Friday and 9 AM–5 PM on Saturday. To register or learn more, please see http://www.spencerart.ku.edu/research/arc/. Fiadeiro’s residency is supported by a grant from the KU Research Investment Council.

WORKSHOP

A Transdisciplinary Exploration of Human Systems

9:00am-5:00pm Saturday, February 21 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art and The Commons

Researchers and practitioners from all disciplines are invited to work with Portuguese choreographer João Fiadeiro to explore the intersections between art and science in a focused two-day workshop. Fiadeiro is in residence at KU from February 15–28 as the first creative specialist hosted by the Spencer Museum's Arts Research Collaboration initiative (ARC). His method of “real-time composition” focuses on process rather than product, transforming movement into a theoretical-practical tool and platform to understand and rethink decision, representation, and cooperation, both in art and in life. Open to all faculty, staff, and students, this workshop will be of special interest to those in the fields of dance and theater, as well as complex systems sciences, cognitive science and linguistics, clinical psychology, anthropology, philosophy, neuroscience, and management. The workshop takes place from 4–8 PM on Friday and 9 AM–5 PM on Saturday. To register or learn more, please see http://www.spencerart.ku.edu/research/arc/. Fiadeiro’s residency is supported by a grant from the KU Research Investment Council.

FACULTY EVENT

The Big Share

12:00-1:30pm Friday, February 27 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

The Big Share brings together faculty from multiple disciplines to discuss their successes and questions about the use of service learning pedagogy tocreate university-community partnerships. Faculty will be encouraged to support one another's efforts, work together, and share their experiences for the benefit of others. The event will create an opportunity to find potential collaborators.

PERFORMANCE

Real-time Composition

João Fiadeiro, Artist in Residence, Spencer Museum of Art
4:00pm Friday, February 27 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art and The Commons

Portuguese choreographer João Fiadeiro is in residence at KU from February 15–28 as the first creative specialist hosted by the Spencer Museum's Arts Research Collaboration initiative (ARC). During his two-week stay, Fiadeiro will work intensively with a small group of performers to explore his method of “real-time composition”, in which the choreographer takes on the role of mediator and facilitator, sharing control with his performers-collaborators. This event comprises a “work-in-progress” presentation from the composition workshop, along with a talk by Fiadeiro about his method and Q&A with the artist and performers.

COLLOQUIUM

Improvising in Place: An Interdisciplinary Jazz Studies Colloquium

8:00am-1:45pm Monday, March 2 | The Commons
Sponsored by the KU Interdisciplinary Jazz Studies Group, The Commons, the Hall Center for the Humanities, the KU Jazz Festival, the Department of American Studies and the Department of Music.

Improvising in Place, explores “place,” broadly defined, as it is traveled, pushed, reshaped, interpreted, and produced by creative improvisers, and is an all-day event beginning at The Commons (8 am - 1:45 pm). The second portion of the colloquium will take place at the Hall Center for the Humanities (2 - 5:30 pm, with reception to follow). Papers presented in the morning session at The Commons cover such topics as the effects of particular urban and rural social geographies of race, nation, ethnicity, gender, and other factors on sounds, venues, and styles (and vice versa); social encounters in cohabited space; and artists' navigations of historical, cultural, and technological limits and possibilities of places, lived and imagined. Afternoon events at the Hall Center include a panel featuring KU professor and filmmaker Kevin Willmott on the days (not so long ago) when jazz was not allowed at KU and students could get kicked out of the practice rooms for doing so. Visiting Big XII Fellow, Dr. Charles Carson, from the UT Austin Musicology and Ethnomusicology faculty, will deliver the keynote talk, entitled “Philadelphia Stories: Race, Place, and the Jazz Geography of the City of Brotherly Love.” Carson is a musicologist whose interests are African-American/American expressive cultures, Popular Music, Jazz, Film Music, and music and culture. His talk will be co-sponsored by the Race, Place, and Space Hall Center Seminar. A performance by KU Jazz Combo 1 will highlight Philadelphia jazz selections, and prove irrefutably that jazz is alive and well in the practice rooms at KU today.

STUDENT EVENT

Coffee Chat

with Katie Rhine, Assistant Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, March 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Hosted by the students of the University Honors Program, Coffee Chats provide a venue for informal conversations between students and KU faculty. The organizing students have selected a theme each month to discuss with the faculty member. March's discussion topic is: Global Medicine.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, March 6 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

Presenters:
Fengjun Li, Electrical Engineering/Computer Science
Dan Reuman, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Armin Schulz, Philosophy
Meg Jamieson, Film & Media Studies
Joe Colistra, Architecture

SYMPOSIUM

Hybrid Practices in the Arts, Sciences, and Technology from the 1960s to Today

Tuesday, March 10 - Friday, March 13 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Spencer Museum of Art, The Kress Foundation Department of Art History, and The Commons

Supported by the Terra Foundation for American Art, this international conference explores three major aspects of hybrid artistic research: key hybrid projects from the past 50 years, including Experiments in Art & Technology (E.A.T.), Art & Technology (A&T), and the Artist Placement Group (APG); shared vocabularies and the role of language in cross-disciplinary collaboration; and the impact of interdisciplinary work on the identity of the hybrid practitioner. Keynote presenters include Anne Collins Goodyear (director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art), artist Mark Dion, Craig Richardson (professor of fine art at Northumbria University, UK), and D. Graham Burnett (editor of Cabinet magazine). Together with papers, roundtables, and keynote presentations, the conference incorporates performative and event-based creative projects grounded in hybrid art-science-technology research.

The conference is free and open to the public. Online registration can be found here: http://www.spencerart.deptsec.ku.edu/arc-conference/arc-conference-registration.php

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Heather Harpham, Theater in Motion

March 23-27
Sponsored by The Commons and the Department of Theatre

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Mennonites on the Move; Understanding Anabaptist migration patterns through the application of univariate genetic markers

Phillip Melton, Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease/Statistical Genetics, University of Western Australia
12:00pm Friday, April 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

STUDENT EVENT

Coffee Chat

with James Woelfel, Professor of Philosophy and Humanities & Western Civilization
4:00-5:30pm Tuesday, April 7 | The Commons
Sponsored by the University Honors Program

Hosted by the students of the University Honors Program, Coffee Chats provide a venue for informal conversations between students and KU faculty. The organizing students have selected a theme each month to discuss with the faculty member. April's discussion topic is: the History of the Liberal Arts at KU.

FACULTY EVENT

The Big Share

12:00-1:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Center for Civic and Social Responsibility

The Big Share brings together faculty from multiple disciplines to discuss their successes and questions about the use of service learning pedagogy tocreate university-community partnerships. Faculty will be encouraged to support one another's efforts, work together, and share their experiences for the benefit of others. The event will create an opportunity to find potential collaborators.

MEETING

C21 Consortium

2:00-3:30pm Friday, April 10 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Movement in Print: Bolivian Migrant Communities and Grassroots Publishing Networks

Magalí Rabasa, Spanish & Portuguese, University of Kansas
12:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

RED HOT RESEARCH

4:00pm Friday, April 17 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

HUMAN MIGRATION SERIES

Human migrations in the Aleutians

Dixie West, Anthropology, Kansas State University
12:00pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, the Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, and The Commons

The Human Migration Series provides a forum for presentations on the nature and consequences of ancient and contemporary patterns of human mobility. The series is designed to enable researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to engage in critical dialogues about biocultural, socioeconomic, political, historical, and environmental issues that affect migration. Initiated by the Department of Anthropology's concentration in Migration, the series encourages the development of partnerships between KU researchers and others who work with issues of human migration.

POSTER SESSION

C21 Consortium

3:30-5:30pm Friday, May 8 | The Commons
Organized by CTE, CODL, the Center for STEM Education Sponsored by the Office of the Provost and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Hosted by The Commons

KU’s C21 (i.e., 21st Century) Consortium is a learning community of individuals from across campus who share a goal of improving and accelerating course redesign at KU. It will connect instructors involved in course redesign with each other and with multiple resources that will facilitate their work. The hub of the consortium is the new CLAS Teaching Postdoc program for the natural sciences and mathematics and social and behavioral sciences. Thus, C21 includes the teaching postdocs and the department faculty with whom they are collaborating, faculty leaders in hybrid course redesign, instructors implementing redesigned courses, and specialists from CTE, CODL, and the Center for STEM Education. The Consortium will also include graduate assistants to support consortium members’ work on their courses, plus a pool of undergraduate peer mentors. Contact Judy Eddy (jeddy@ku.edu) at the Center for Teaching Excellence, with questions.