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Programs & Events Programs and Events

WORKSHOP

Teaching African American History: Citizen in Context

Pero Dagbovie, Professor of African American History, Michigan State University
1:00-3:00pm Thursday, January 18 | The Commons
Supported by the Office of First-Year Experience and the College Office of Graduate Affairs

This session will engage a variety of texts and academic disciplines and will benefit instructors teaching the 2017-2018 KU Common Book, Citizen: An American Lyric.

Faculty and GTAs who will utilize the KU Common Book in their course(s) are encouraged to attend. Those interested in participating to RSVP to the Office of First-Year Experience.

KENNETH SPENCER LECTURE

Eve L. Ewing

Hybrid Lecture/Poetry Reading: Poetry in Context
7:00pm Wednesday, January 31 | Liberty Hall

Eve L. Ewing is a writer and scholar from Chicago. She is the author of Electric Arches and When the Bell Stops Ringing: Race, History, and Discourse amid Chicago's School Closures. She also co-wrote the multimedia performance No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks. Her work has been published in Poetry magazine, The New York Times, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, and many other venues. She is a sociologist of education at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. She also co-directs Crescendo Literary (a partnership that develops community-engaged arts events and educational resources) and is one-half of the writing collective Echo Hotel, alongside Hanif Abdurraqib.

Tickets are free but required.
Available here: https://www.universe.com/embed2/events/kenneth-spencer-lecture-eve-l-ewing-poetry-in-context-tickets-lawrence-RTY3FC​

WORKSHOP

People's State of the Union

2:00-5:00pm Saturday, February 3 | The Commons
Sponsored by the US Department of Arts and Culture - Lawrence Field Office, the Spencer Museum of Art, and The Commons

Every January, the President delivers a State of the Union address highlighting important issues from the past year and suggesting priorities for the coming year. It’s a broadcast from one to many. But democracy is a conversation, not a monologue. Understanding the state of our union takes We the People reflecting in our own communities on our challenges and opportunities locally, nationally, and globally. Join us for a People's State of the Union Story Circle! This is a powerful way of coming together, getting to know one another, and reflecting on the state of our community, country, and world. Learn more about the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture and the People's State of the Union here: www.usdac.us/psotu

This event is offered in conjunction with Pledges of Allegiance, a public art project featuring flags created by contemporary artists to reflect the current political climate.

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 6 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 45: Representation/Participation

4:00pm Friday, February 9 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.
Presenters:
Genelle Belmas, Journalism
Tanya Hartman, Visual Art
Dave Tell, Communication Studies
Kimber Richter, Preventative Medicine & Public Health
Maria Orive, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Emcee: Emily Ryan, The Commons

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, February 20 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

BOOK LAUNCH & SCENE BURST

#DisCritButterflies: Book Launch & Scene Burst

7:00pm Wednesday, February 21 | The Commons
Supported by the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Center for Sexuality and Gender Diversity, the Langston Hughes Center, the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, the Disability Studies Program, and The Commons

Join us as we put two complementary yet distinctive mediums in conversation with each other in our collaborative book launch and scene burst. Using excerpts from Professor Subini Annamma’s Book “The Pedagogy of Pathologization” and scenes from Professor Darren Canady’s play “Black Butterflies”, the audience will engage the ways girls of color are labeled defiant, disobedient and disabled within a carceral state. Following the readings, there will be a community discussion with both professors and the actors on how they experience and resist systemic inequities uniquely facing multiply-marginalized girls of color.

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Red Hot Graduate Research No. 5

4:00pm Friday, February 23 | The Commons

Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

BOOK TALK: They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us

Hanif Abudurraqib

Poet, TV Writer, Essayist, Music & Culture Critic
7:00pm Tuesday, February 27 | The Raven Bookstore
Supported by the Raven Bookstore, the Department of English, the Department of American Studies, the Department of African & African-American Studies, the Langston Hughes Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, The Office of Diversity and Equity, the Hall Center for the Humanities, and The Commons

Hanif Abdurraqib is a poet, writer, and cultural critic from Columbus, Ohio. His essays and music criticism have been published in The FADER, Pitchfork, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. With Big Lucks, Hanif released a limited edition chapbook, Vintage Sadness, in Summer 2017. He is a Callaloo Creative Writing Fellow and previously worked for MTV News, where he wrote about the intersections of music, culture, and identity. Hanif also wrote the 2016 live shows: MTV Video Music Awards and VH1’s Unsilent Night. His first full length collection, The Crown Ain't Worth Much, was one of 2016's best-selling poetry books and was named a finalist for the Eric Hoffer Book prize. Hanif's debut collection of essays titled, They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us, was published in November 2017 via Two Dollar Radio. He is a member of the poetry collective Echo Hotel with poet/essayist Eve L. Ewing.

Tickets: https://www.universe.com/events/hanif-abdurraqib-reading-signing-tickets-lawrence-FLH123?ref=uniiverse-transactional_emailer-host_posted_listing

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 46: People, Land, Power

4:00pm Friday, March 2 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, March 6 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

FILM SCREENING: DOUBLE FEATURE

Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry (5:30pm) and Dolores (7:15pm)

5:30pm & 7:15pm Wednesday, March 14 | Liberty Hall
Co-sponsored by: the KU Environmental Studies Program, the Department of American Studies, the Department of Sociology, the Center for Sustainability, and The Commons

Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry revolves around the divergent stories of several residents of Henry County, Kentucky who each face difficult choices that will dramatically reshape their relationship with the land and their community. In 1965, Wendell Berry returned home to Henry County, where he bought a small farm house and began a life of farming, writing and teaching. This lifelong relationship with the land and community would come to form the core of his prolific writings. A half century later Henry County, like many rural communities across America, has become a place of quiet ideological struggle. In the span of a generation, the agrarian virtues of simplicity, land stewardship, sustainable farming, local economies and rootedness to place have been replaced by a capital-intensive model of industrial agriculture characterized by machine labor, chemical fertilizers, soil erosion and debt--all of which have frayed the fabric of rural communities. Writing from a long wooden desk beneath a forty-paned window, Berry has watched this struggle unfold, becoming one its most passionate and eloquent voices in defense of agrarian life. Filmed across four seasons in the farming cycle, Look & See blends observational scenes of farming life, interviews with farmers and community members with evocative, carefully framed shots of the surrounding landscape. Thus, in the spirit of Berry's agrarian philosophy, Henry County itself will emerge as a character in the film--a place and a landscape that is deeply interdependent with the people that inhabit it.

Dolores profiles Dolores Huerta, one of the most important, yet least known, activists in American history. An equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez, her enormous contributions have gone largely unrecognized. Dolores tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century-and she continues the fight to this day, at 87. With intimate and unprecedented access to this intensely private mother to eleven, the film reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one's life to social change. Directed by Peter Bratt.

Tickets for the evening are available here: https://www.universe.com/events/double-screening-look-see-a-portrait-of-wendell-berry-dolores-tickets-lawrence-LJWCDF?ref=universe-discover

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Red Hot Graduate Research No. 6

4:00pm Friday, March 30 | The Commons

Red Hot Graduate Research is intended to bring together graduate researchers from all disciplines. The format of these sessions is inspired by Red Hot Research, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. In this iteration, Red Hot Graduate Research will feature five graduate researchers speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, graduate students will have an opportunity for cross-disciplinary discourse that will in turn give new perspectives on their work and provide a forum for future work in their chosen research fields.

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, April 3 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 47: Fear & Response

4:00pm Friday, April 6 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, April 17 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/

FACULTY EVENT

Red Hot Research No. 48: Science & Fiction

4:00pm Friday, April 27 | The Commons

Red Hot Research is intended to bring together scholars from all disciplines, in response to the call set forth by Bold Aspirations. The format of these sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha, which features short, slide-based talks that introduce audiences to a topic. Each installment features faculty members, speaking for six minutes each. Audience members are encouraged to connect with the speakers (and each other) during breaks. We hope that through these sessions, faculty members will have a venue for cross-disciplinary partnering and exploration.
Presenters:
Ben Merriman, School of Public Affairs & Administration
Alison Olcott Marshall, Geology
Brandon DeKosky, Chemical Engineering & Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Jude Kastens, Kansas Biological Survey
Jonathan P. Lamb, English

GRADUATE STUDENT EVENT

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays

9:30-11:00am Tuesday, May 1 | The Commons
Supported by The College Office of Graduate Affairs and The Commons

Shut Up & Write Tuesdays is a global network for writers that offers:

• committed, condensed time to write, and
• built-in feedback from peers

It began as a movement for writers in San Francisco to structure their time and connect with other writers. The idea was simple: write for an hour, then grab coffee afterward to converse and build community. Academics embraced the practice, and the idea spread. Dr. Sioban O’Dwyer founded a virtual Shut Up & Write Tuesdays to provide the benefits of the traditional meetups for those who could not attend in-person.
The event has a basic structure: Two 25-minute writing blocks, separated by 5-minute breaks. Afterward, attendees are encouraged to connect via Twitter, using #suwtna. Learn more about the SUWT team; read about tips for improving writing time; and find non-academic reads to inform practice at https://suwtuesdays.wordpress.com/